News

Azevedo named to the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee

Azevedo named to the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee
Inês Azevedo will provide technical and programmatic advice to the Energy Secretary about the Department of Energy’s hydrogen research.

The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) was established under Section 807 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005PDF to provide technical and programmatic advice to the Energy Secretary on DOE’s hydrogen research, development, and demonstration efforts.

HTAC includes representatives from domestic industry, academia, professional societies, government agencies, financial organizations, and environmental groups. Their work is guided by a formal charterPDF, which is renewed every two years. Find answers to frequently asked questions about HTAC.

View information about upcoming and past HTAC meetings and find links to HTAC reports. For more information, email the HTAC administrator.

Nathaniel Horner and Inês Azevedo Published in Environmental Research Letters

Nathaniel Horner and Inês Azevedo, with Arman Shehabi of LBNL, reviewed dozens of studies on the “indirect” energy effects of information and communication technology (ICT) services like e-commerce and telework.  Though ICT has compelling energy savings potential, uncertainty in implementation details and higher-order effects make the actual net energy effect hard to calculate.  http://tinyurl.com/Nat-Ines

Long Lam and Ines Azevedo Featured on CMU College of Engineering Website

long-and-ines-paper

ZERO EMISSIONS DAY: CHINA’S WIND ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE

From the article:

“In December 2015, U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping attended the United Nations’ 21st Climate Change Conference (UN COP21). The two presidents, representatives of the two largest producers of greenhouse gases on the globe, pledged to work together to establish a climate change agreement to mitigate the enormous impact greenhouse gases have had, and are having, on global warming.

“Thus, the Paris Agreement was formed. This agreement, the world’s first comprehensive climate agreement, is a pledge negotiated by the 196 countries in attendance at UN COP21 to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions by adopting renewable energy sources.

“In the wake of the Paris summit, engineering and public policy (EPP) Ph.D. student Long Lam studies China’s efforts to deploy renewable energy and mitigate its carbon emissions. Focusing on wind and solar energy, Lam studies China’s wind turbine innovation capabilities, dynamics within the solar photovoltaic industry, and the trajectories of various solar photovoltaic technologies in the marketplace.

“Lam recently published a paper, co-authored by EPP Associate Professor Inês Azevedo and Social and Decision Sciences’ Lee Branstetter, entitled “China’s wind electricity and cost of carbon mitigation are more expensive than anticipated.” The paper, published in Environmental Research Letters, discusses how China’s efforts to cut emissions from its coal power plants by 60% by 2020 have been slowed, despite a massive initiative to build up the country’s wind energy infrastructure.”

Read the rest of the article at: http://engineering.cmu.edu/media/feature/2016/09_21_lam_china_wind.html