First year PhD student Priya Donti heavily engaged in energy and climate data rescue plan

The Pittsburgh Post Gazette features an article on Priya Donti’s efforts in the Data Rescue plan for EPA information targeted by the Trump Administration.

“The strength of a democracy rests on the ability of all of its citizens to have access to data and decisions that will allow them to make their own informed choices,” Ms. Donti said. “If that data is removed, or if that data is controlled, it’s sort of equivalent to controlling how people are able to think or speak.”

Read more at: http://www.post-gazette.com/local/region/2017/04/03/Donald-Trump-EPA-data-Carnegie-Library-Pittsburgh-Data-Rescue-Pittsburgh/stories/201704030063

Ines Azevedo Interviewed by WESA on Trump’s Clean Coal Plan

“‘Clean coal could only be clean coal if you have very aggressive air control technologies implemented and (are also) addressing the CO2 emissions by installing carbon capture and sequestration in parallel,’ [Azevedo] said. ‘But that’s really hard.’

“Azevedo said it’s hard because it’s expensive. Despite the fact that academics first began exploring carbon capture and sequestration technology in 1989, it was only in January that the nation’s first ‘clean coal’ power plant opened.”

Read and listen at: http://wesa.fm/post/pa-electricity-generation-moving-away-coal-would-it-move-back-under-trump#stream/0

Climate Central Quotes Ines Azevedo

Bobby Magill quoted Ines Azevedo in his piece “Electricity’s Carbon Footprint in U.S. Shrinks, Sets Record”.

“Climate pollution from generating electricity is now more than 24 percent below where it was in 2005, said Ines Azevedo, an associate professor of engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University, whose research team’s Power Sector Carbon Index echoes DOE’s data.

“The index, published at the end of March, uses both Environmental Protection Agency and DOE data to show how quickly many different factors have come together to cut the carbon footprint of electric power plants.

“A mild winter in 2016 — the hottest year on record worldwide, thanks to global warming —  also helped U.S. carbon emissions fall last year.

“‘Because more energy is used for heating than for cooling, warm years can translate to less energy consumption,’ according to the DOE report.

“Azevedo said that electric power plants shifting from coal to natural gas are responsible for about half the electric power sector’s carbon pollution drop between 2005 and 2016. Increased use of renewables such as wind and solar accounted for 40 percent of the falloff, with power plant efficiency and other factors representing the rest.”

Read more at: http://www.climatecentral.org/news/electricity-carbon-footprint-us-shrinks-21336

Our piece on carbon footprints for cities was selected as the Editor’s Featured Article in ERL!

Our piece on "An integrated approach for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from 100 U.S. metropolitan areas" has been selected as an "Editor's Featured Article"!

You can see this and other feature articles at: http://iopscience.iop.org/collection/10/1?collectionType=FEATURED_ARTICLES&journal=1748-9326&subject=&online_date=all

Congratulations to Sam Markolf, Scott Mathhews and Chris Hendrickson who were also co-authors in this piece!

 

Launching our Power Sector Carbon Index!

Today we are launching our Power Sector Carbon Index! Check it out at https://emissionsindex.org!

The Power Sector Carbon Index provides an estimate of the carbon dioxide (CO2) intensity of the U.S. power sector using publicly available data sources. Carbon intensity is measured in pounds of CO2 per Megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity.

What is the carbon intensity? See below!

EmissionsIndex2016Q4

Fossil Fuels’ Final Century! Article featured Inês Azevedo in Carnegie Mellon Today

“What are the options? How do we build a decarbonized world? Ines Azevedo studies both the logistics and repercussions of energy systems. She looks beyond the solutions themselves to examine the results, in terms of policy feasibility, consumer behavior and total carbon emissions. To her, it is clear that the priorities for change need to be those that will be centralized and long lasting. To that end, ‘It’s easier to change several thousand power plants than millions of cars – though to solve the climate problem we will ultimately need to tackle both.'”

Azevedo, Tong, and Jaramillo Piece Featured on Green Car Congress

From the article: “According to a new lifecycle analysis by a team at Carnegie Mellon University, a battery electric vehicle (BEV) powered with natural gas-based electricity achieves around an average 40% lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction when compared to a conventional gasoline vehicle. Plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), either with a 30- or 60-km range, when powered by natural gas electricity, have the second lowest average emissions. Both BEVs and PHEVs provide large (more than 20%) emissions reductions compared to conventional gasoline, but none of them is a dominant strategy when compared to gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), the team found.”

Scientific American Features Azevedo/Hittinger Piece

The article by Robert Fares highlights my recent work: “While there is no doubt that energy storage can help integrate renewable energy with the grid, a recent study by Eric Hittinger of the Rochester Institute of Technology and Inês Azevedo of Carnegie Mellon University indicates that bulk energy storage would most likely increase total U.S. electricity system emissions if it were installed today, because it would typically store electricity generated from fossil fuels rather than renewable sources.” Read the rest here.